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NDTL to Build and Test 10MW-Class sCO2 Compressors

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The use of supercritical CO2 (or sCO2) as the working fluid in closed-loop Brayton Cycles and advanced electrothermal energy storage systems has shown great promise in delivering electricity with high efficiency, creating fuel flexibility, and reducing power-plant size and cost. A number of new technology advancements, however, must be realized in order to make sCO2

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Aeromechanics of a Power Turbine

V3

Gas-turbine engines provide a large percentage of the electricity used around the world. The turbine blades that deliver the shaft power to generators must be able to withstand high mechanical stress, extreme heat, and unsteady aerodynamic forces. Under some circumstances, a self-excited aeroelastic instability—termed flutter

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NDTL and NASA Collaborate to Study Broadband Noise Control

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NASA Glenn Research Center and the Notre Dame Turbomachinery Laboratory (NDTL) are working together to understand and control broadband noise created by turbofan engines. The Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) shown above (left) is an experimental facility with a 4-foot diameter fan that rotates at speeds up to 1800 RPM. The project objectives include the study and control of the broadband noise generated by the fan stage. Actuators have been placed on the fan’s stator (above right) with the intent of using active control to reduce noise observed in the far field.…

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NDTL Advances Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

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The accurate and efficient simulation of combustion flows remains a significant challenge. Recent advancements in turbulence modeling and numerical algorithms at the Notre Dame Turbomachinery Laboratory (NDTL) have demonstrated promising new capabilities. The temperature contours shown above illustrate the Wavenumber Adaptive Simulation (WAS) method developed at NDTL as well as the solution from a traditional Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The WAS technique is a form of hybrid turbulence model that is both accurate and numerically efficient. Both simulations provided a similar level of resolution and accuracy, while the WAS required approximately half of the computational costs.

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